Applying Futurism: slide deck

Posted by on

This afternoon I’m giving a talk at the Alliance Manchester Business School to an audience of MBAs and Masters students on the subject of Applied Futurism. Since this slide deck might be useful in your outreach to customers and your colleagues I’ve decided to share it here, exclusively with subscribers.

I build my slide decks using the Impress.js Javascript library, which means they can be published straight to the web and run in almost any web browser. It’s open source so you can use the same technology without any licence fees. Its capabilities go way beyond my usage, allowing you to build presentations in three dimensions, with any combination of position, scale and visual effects. Much like Prezi but open, portable and more widely supported.

The downside of Impress is that you have to write your presentations in HTML and CSS. It’s not wildly complicated but you probably don’t want to tackle it unless you have some experience with these languages, or the time to learn. However the slide decks can still be useful: all the images used are available in a zip file. These can all be used in your own presentations, whatever software you use (Keynote, Powerpoint, Prezi etc).

Over time we will build up a more formal library of images and videos in a format that you can drag and drop into presentations. I’m open to suggestions about how we do this: web downloads, Dropbox, Sync or maybe Git.

If you’d like me to walk you through the script, drop me a line and we’ll set up a meet or a call. And check out the post on the public blog about the ‘athlete analogy’ at the end of the slide deck: the blog post is much more expansive than the script will be.

You can find the slide deck here. To download the images used, click here.

 

This post forms part of my Futurism series. For more posts on this subject, visit the Futurism page.

four + four =

Share this article ...

Future News

Subscribe to my newsletter and get weekly stories plus other insight into tomorrow's world.

Latest Articles

Tom Cheesewright